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ACT Hair Event

Earlier this year Michael Pitsillides approached us to talk about a charity event that SLATE Hair Education was organising for the second year here in London. A night filled with brilliant live shows from not only SLATE but also Gianni Scumaci and ZGAT was also premiering Trevor Sorbie’s life documentary followed by a thorough Q&A and was dedicated to Trevor’s wonderful charity my new hair.

my new hair is dedicated to providing public advice and supporting a national network of independent salons offering a wig styling service to people suffering from cancer and medical hair loss. They’re also all about education, providing training and workshops to hair professionals interested in learning the ropes. If you’re interested in joining my new hair’s network of salons head over to their website for more information.

We had the chance to not only experience but also document the wonderful night. Have a look at the video to get the glimpse of what it was all about and we hope to see you during the next edition!

Q&A with Trevor Sorbie at the ACT Hair Event

Following the premiere of his life documentary, Trevor Sorbie sat down with Michael Pitsillides from SLATE Hair Education to talk about his inspirations, ideals, what drove and still drives his career and what matters to him as an educator.

Kristof Pacura’s ‘1989’

“Education gives you the freedom to do what you love and if you do what you love you inspire people.”

Artist, hairdresser and photographer Kristof Pacura talks about his 1989 collection inspired by the Polish youth culture from the 80s, fighting for freedom, independence and opportunities that later generations take for granted.

Loose Mullet

In this tutorial Tom Warr from Blue Tit Academy presents how to create an easy to wear mullety cut, great for your everyday salon work. 

Working with naturally ginger and curly hair, Tom keeps them long and layered. Through the front he disconnects the layers and brings them all forward. On the back and the sides, Tom uses triangle layers going from short to long, starting at the back and behind the ear, moving around the head using pivoting sections. 

Throughout the cut, he focuses on the aspects of the style he would like to preserve and accentuate. Not all haircuts have to be cut to length first and here Tom chooses to work with the already existing length.

The Halo

Inspiration can come from anywhere. The idea for Metropolis Hairdressing’s Ceri Cushen’s style arose when light hit her model’s hair at a certain angle creating an interesting effect. In this tutorial Ceri presents how to recreate it with colour.

The Halo is created using a dark, metallic purple on model’s natural root and sliced in between copper on the back of the hair, along with a prelightener used on the line where both colours bleed into one another. 

Although here the effect is created on a square bob, it can be applied to any length and style.

Throughout the technique Ceri uses model’s very short fringe as the point of reference, dictating the height and the angle of the Halo, however, if your model doesn’t have a fringe you can use the corner of the section where the eyebrow reaches a peak instead.

Tom Connell’s Undersweep

In the Undersweep, Tom Connell presents how to create more of an editorial haircut – not too precise, rigid or commercial, but with a lot of softness achieved through rough detail. Combining the precision of hairdressing with the softness and wearability from the editorial and session world, Tom creates a graduated shape with a lot of internal movement and structure, blending together  structural and precise cutting underneath with freehand razor technique on the top.

Throughout the cut, Tom follows the natural movement of model’s hair and the organically occurring lines, letting the hair kick out where it wants to kick out and sit straight were it wants to sit straight. In order to achieve a desired look, he stresses the importance of looking at one’s character and personality when choosing a model, which are just as important as bone structure in making the style work.

Following the model’s natural features also dictates how Tom works with the hair, not wetting it too much in order to see the shape and the flick developing, as when the hair is soaking wet you can’t get the feel for the natural movement.

To accentuate this, he leaves out little imperfections to create the sense of softness. For every hard and structured part he’s doing, he leaves out little soft details “Wrapping the hard stuff in cotton wool” ensuring the soft and pretty feel of the cut.

It’s the little details that can make or break the haircut. You put a little detail in the haircut and it can create a completely different style.

Focusing on character, Tom is also working with the colour that has been naturally grown out instead of having a fresh, artificial colour. This adds extra dimensions to the haircut especially with darker shade coming through from underneath.

The rough feel Tom is aiming for also dictates the use of a razor and the wide teeth of the comb so that he can see the natural lines developing as he goes along. Following these allows him to break the structure and symmetry in the cut, with little details differentiating the left from the right side so that it’s not too contrived or fixed. Despite this, both sides individually have some degree of softness making the haircut pretty and wearable without being precise.

Although the cut looks rough and shattered through, it does require a certain level of technicality “you need to learn the rules so you can start breaking the rules”. Without that foundation, it might look good on the day but it isn’t going to grow out well. So watch the video, try it at home and share the results with us.

Behind INFRINGE

The innovative and inspiring hairdresser, industry icon Anthony Mascolo sat down with us and talked through the many layers of creativity and success, with discipline, passion and obsession at the forefront. 

That along with the need to give back to the industry is what gave birth to INFRINGE – the book of creativity of which Issue 3 has been recently launched at Salon International.

Tom Connell’s Undersweep

In the Undersweep, Tom Connell presents how to create more of an editorial haircut – not too precise, rigid or commercial, but with a lot of softness achieved through rough detail. Combining the precision of hairdressing with the softness and wearability from the editorial and session world, Tom creates a graduated shape with a lot of internal movement and structure, blending together  structural and precise cutting underneath with freehand razor technique on the top.

Throughout the cut, Tom follows the natural movement of model’s hair and the organically occurring lines, letting the hair kick out where it wants to kick out and sit straight were it wants to sit straight. In order to achieve a desired look, he stresses the importance of looking at one’s character and personality when choosing a model, which are just as important as bone structure in making the style work.

Following the model’s natural features also dictates how Tom works with the hair, not wetting it too much in order to see the shape and the flick developing, as when the hair is soaking wet you can’t get the feel for the natural movement.

To accentuate this, he leaves out little imperfections to create the sense of softness. For every hard and structured part he’s doing, he leaves out little soft details “Wrapping the hard stuff in cotton wool” ensuring the soft and pretty feel of the cut.

It’s the little details that can make or break the haircut. You put a little detail in the haircut and it can create a completely different style.

Focusing on character, Tom is also working with the colour that has been naturally grown out instead of having a fresh, artificial colour. This adds extra dimensions to the haircut especially with darker shade coming through from underneath.

The rough feel Tom is aiming for also dictates the use of a razor and the wide teeth of the comb so that he can see the natural lines developing as he goes along. Following these allows him to break the structure and symmetry in the cut, with little details differentiating the left from the right side so that it’s not too contrived or fixed. Despite this, both sides individually have some degree of softness making the haircut pretty and wearable without being precise.

Although the cut looks rough and shattered through, it does require a certain level of technicality “you need to learn the rules so you can start breaking the rules”. Without that foundation, it might look good on the day but it isn’t going to grow out well. So watch the video, try it at home and share the results with us.

Modern Twist

Here Charlie Gray from Menspire Academy presents a classic look with a contemporary and creative twist.

Charlie creates a  diagonal graduation through the sides of the head, with disconnected sideburns, triangular shape through the top with hair increasing in length to the front of the head, very free flowing and with lots of movement, finished off with a creative neckline. 

Throughout the cut, Charlie stresses the importance of breaking the haircut into zones, here a top area through the contour, recession area, the apex and sides, which allow him to create a precise shape whilst also working organically with the crown. To achieve this, he visually looks at the roots and where they want to sit. This is possible through keeping the sections clean and hair wet, while making sure the cutting line is nice and precise. To ensure this, Charlie also focuses on which side of the haircut he’s standing on as he goes, to retain more control and to avoid putting his body under any stress.

Also with the blow dry, Charlie works through the hair in panels, with the dryer on medium speed and low heat to get close to the scalp and have more control over the blow dry without burning the model. 

The cut is finished off with a personal touch – the creative neckline, which also compliments the model’s head shape. 

Neon Geometry

In this tutorial Sean Nolan from HOB Academy and Salons and Creative Educator for the Wella Colour Creative Team presents a bright and vivid 70s Neon Geometry inspired style. Utilising a commercial, yet creative colouring technique you can use in a salon, Sean creates a geometric shape with neon finish on the hair, inspired by the Japanese culture and the concept of Wabi-sabi, understanding and appreciating the beauty of ageing and transient of things. 

The Neon Geometry look is aligned with HOBs ethos of harmonious colouring, using a cool palette of well blending pink and purple. Whilst creating the style, Sean focuses on suitability, ensuring the colours suit the model’s skin tone but also her fashion sense, thus making sure the model will wear her hair as opposed to the hair wearing the model. 

Despite harmonious blending, the colours are intentionally patchy. Whilst applying the pink and purple, Sean works more as a colourist rather than hair colourist, visually working out how the outcome will look rather than following a particular pattern. He uses the natural qualities of the colours and their vibrance for contouring throughout, achieving a flat effect on the dark, aubergine root, with a lot of texture in the pink areas. 

To spice up the look, on the previously prelightened undercut Sean presents how to achieve a peekaboo feature, a sunset blend with pink harmoniously blending into purple. Using a flat brush, first as flat and heavy as possible for maximum saturation, later using it vertically to reduce saturation and blend the two colours.